Preservation

The current LSU/VA plan abandons Charity Hospital, one of New Orleans' most iconic architectural and cultural wonders. The plan also calls for the destruction of 249 historic homes in the Lower Mid-City neighborhood. The National Trust for Historic Preservation named Charity Hospital and the adjacent Lower Mid-City neighborhood to its 2008 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. It is believed that the German immigrants who settled Lower Mid City in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries provided the brass influence that helped foster the development of Jazz, arguably the most important musical movement in American history. Charity Hospital itself has been the birthplace of many of the artists that have established New Orleans as one of the nation's most unique and irreplaceable communities.

Below you will find a collection of articles pertaining to the preservation issue:

41 Organizations Call on Governor and City Leaders For Open Process In Decision-Making For Major Hospitals

On Wednesday, March 25th, 41 local and national organizations - including a diverse range of community groups, professional organizations and planning associations - are asking state and city leaders to engage the public more directly in the search for a solution. Attached is the press release from the event.

Fact Sheet on Charity Hospital, prepared by FHL and RMJM Hillier

The Louisiana Legislature charged the Foundation for Historical Louisiana to conduct and independent assessment of Charity Hospital in New Orleans. FHL retained RMJM Hillier, internationally renowned architects in preservation and healthcare design, to conduct this extensive study with two main goals: structural soundness and potential reuse. This document is a summary of their findings.

Times-Picayune Column: "Unhealthy attitude infects LSU"

COLUMN BY JAMES GILL:

If I want to put the arm on the taxpayer for $1.2 billion, and commandeer a vast chunk of downtown, I think I make nice.

I figure I need friends and everyone must be convinced I am on the level.

But LSU, which wants to abandon Charity and build a glittering new hospital nearby, is putting a lot of noses out of joint. It is in a big row with FEMA, and threatens to give its neighbor, the Tulane Medical Center, the bum's rush.

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Times-Picayune: "Feds plan to settle FEMA's bill for Charity - Napolitano calls for meeting to nail down damage amount"

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said she plans to call state and federal officials together in Washington, D.C., soon to try to settle a three-year dispute about how much FEMA owes Louisiana for Hurricane Katrina damage to Charity Hospital.

The eventual outcome -- state and federal officials remain almost $350 million apart -- is a key piece of the financing puzzle for a proposed $1.2 billion academic medical complex in lower Mid-City to replace University Hospital and the shuttered Charity building.

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WWLTV: "Preservationists: Renovating Charity could save the state millions"

BATON ROUGE, La. –  A group preservationists are making a pitch to state lawmakers to save and rehabilitate Charity Hospital, which they contend is cheaper and faster than building a new hospital, rather than building a new medical complex in the Tulane-Gravier area of New Orleans.

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"How Would You Feel?" - New Orleans Resident Diana Monely

Diana Monely has worked for the city of New Orleans for 30 years and lived in her Mid-City home for 35, but now will lose her house if the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Louisiana State University go forward with a plan to use the Mid-City neighborhood for the site of their new hospitals. These hospitals would needlessly destroy the historic neighborhood around Charity Hospital where residents have been rebuilding and restoring their community since Hurricane Katrina. Learn more at http://www.preservationnation.org/savemidcity

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"It Doesn't Make Any Sense to Me" - Homeowner Roberta "Bobbi" Rogers

A year and a half after receiving $45,000 in preservation grants from the state of Louisiana, Bobbi Rogers is faced with having her home demolished... by the state of Louisiana. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Louisiana State University plan to use the Mid-City neighborhood for the site of their new hospitals, needlessly destroying the historic neighborhood around Charity Hospital where residents have been rebuilding and restoring their community since Hurricane Katrina. Learn more at http://www.preservationnation.org/savemidcity

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"We're going to fight to the last" - Lower Mid City Homeowners Larry & Barbara Dillon

Since they returned after Hurricane Katrina, Barbara Dillon and her husband Larry have struggled to renovate their house. Now, they may lose the home they've worked to save if the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Louisiana State University go forward with a plan to use the Mid-City neighborhood for the site of their new hospitals. These hospitals would needlessly destroy the historic neighborhood around Charity Hospital where residents have been rebuilding and restoring their community since Hurricane Katrina. Learn more at http://www.preservationnation.org/savemidcity

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"Where are we going to go?" - New Orleans native and recent returnee Howard Allen

New Orleans Native Howard Allen just returned to his hometown in April, and now may displaced again if the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Louisiana State University go forward with a plan to use the Mid-City neighborhood for the site of their new hospitals. These hospitals would needlessly destroy the historic neighborhood around Charity Hospital where residents have been rebuilding and restoring their community since Hurricane Katrina. Learn more at http://www.preservationnation.org/savemidcity

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"The city asked everybody to come back... We did." Gayle Ruth, New Orleans Native

New Orleans native Gayle Ruth restored her home after Hurricane Katrina but now may lose it to the wrecking ball if the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Louisiana State University go forward with a plan to use the Mid-City neighborhood for the site of their new hospitals. These hospitals would needlessly destroy the historic neighborhood around Charity Hospital where residents have been rebuilding and restoring their community since Hurricane Katrina. Learn more at http://www.preservationnation.org/savemidcity

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